Shipwrecked Boat Trip in Phi Phi

The Shipwrecked Boat Tour is an exciting cruise that mixes exotic sea escapades with an enjoyable party atmosphere. Sail towards some fascinating spots along the Andaman Sea off the coast of Koh Phi Phi while you enjoy a wide array of cocktails. Indulge in yacht-hosted fun parties that are very popular, especially with younger travelers, but with everyone very much welcome to join the fun. Let’s know more about this extraordinary experience.

Highlights of Shipwrecked Boat Trips

The Shipwrecked Boat Tour consists of seven (7) famous destinations, stopping around the Phi Phi Islands. Explore the famous Monkey Beach, Maya Bay, Viking Cave, Table Coral City Reefs, Pi Leh Lagoon, and Snake Cave, and a mysterious, secret location for sunset watching for you to find out.

The Shipwrecked Boat Tour in Koh Phi Phi highlights the “15 Best Things to Do in the Phi Phi Islands.” Excursions with the Shipwrecked Boat Tour include freshly prepared meals for lunch, dinner, and snacks. There is also snorkeling gear that’s also available use.

When onboard, enjoy free-flowing alcohol, including beers and cocktails. Non-alcoholic beverages such as juices, water, and sodas are also available. Start your trip from 11 am until 9 pm. The crew is warm welcoming, providing free T-shirts, meals, shots, party games, and a photo opportunity. Exciting, right?

Shipwreck Tour Sites

Shipwreck Tour Sites

Across Koh Phi Phi, many of the top diving locations in the ocean showcase artificial reefs. But also, natural wrecks that have sunk over time loiter extravagantly on the ocean floor. Koh Phi Phi serves as no exception. One legendary wreck is the King Cruiser wreck, which dropped in 1997, and the Kled Gaeow wreck, which sunk quite recently in 2014.

Both of these remarkable destinations are perfect for all divers alike – advanced or specialist, even newbies – and may be part of completing an Advanced or specialty diver training.

Kled Keaow Wreck

Decommissioned in 2014, this ship was donated and purposefully destroyed on March 19, 2014, through controlled explosion, establishing it as a new-found dive destination. This 47-meter-long wreck practically sits upright on a 20-degree list facing north-south bow-sterned around 800-1000 meters east of Piley Bay or in Ko Phi Phi Leh.

The tower top is about 14-16 meters deep. Depending on the tide, the main deck approximately measures 20 meters deep, with the bottom measuring 26 meters deep. Divers with remarkable buoyancy can penetrate a reasonably achievable variety of entries. A raised deck starts in the boat’s bow, reaching through the exterior stairs that lead up from the main deck.

Two doors are located on the main deck, near the steps, leading to a spacious cooler room or, at times, used as a compartment that holds the anchor and chains. You can also reach this area from the roof hatch opening, called porthole, of the elevated deck. The 13.5m-long mast, positioned across the Main Deck towards the center area, has long been broken so as not to become an obstruction for any boats passing overhead.

On the deck, 3m-wide long hatch through which you may view down to the patio or hull below and penetrate it if you desire. Be warned, however: Once you’ve gone through this entrance, the path towards the core area is dark and would require a guide rope, especially for those who have poor vision.

Diving to the Kled Keaow Shipwreck

The following morning, you’ll meet at the diving shop on Moo Street, taking a short walk from the port of Ko Phi Phi Don. You’ll set your sails from this Thai island towards several destinations in one of the world’s diving hotspots – the Andaman Sea!

First, you’ll dive into the wreck of the Kled Kaew. One of the Royal Thai Navy’s support ships, Kled Keaow, sunk in 2014. This 380-ton ship, 160 feet long, spends the rest of eternity at the bottom of the Andaman Sea. On the other hand, this ship was purposefully sunk through a controlled way, giving the fish in the region sanctuary underneath the vessel’s hull.

During your dive, you’ll witness amazing marine life living beneath the Kled Kaew. It is a perfect hotspot for biodiversity – with lionfish, scorpionfish, yellowtail barracudas, and other incredible species calling this 100-feet surface beneath the wreck their home. Fun fact: this section of Thailand has become among the most famous underwater destinations for fantastic photography globally.

You’ll return to the boat after this initial dive for a break so well-deserved before sailing towards the following dive site in the Andaman Sea, time for your second great underwater adventure.

Finally, you’ll go back to the original departure dock, arriving around after midday.

King Cruiser Shipwreck

Sunk across Phuket’s coast, the ferry King Cruiser has been sitting on the ocean floor since May 4, 1997. It was making its way from Phuket to Koh Phi Phi when it made a collision, submerging it towards the pinnacle of Anemone Reef, about ten (10) kilometers from Koh Phi Phi. This untimely collision ripped off the ship’s hull, breaking the reef in half! It took two (2) hours and thirty minutes, and another kilometer for the boat to fully sink. Thankfully, all of its 561 persons on board were rescued.

The King Cruiser is an 85-meter-long boat that has become a famous artificial reef, complementing the Anemone Reef. It sits 30 meters deep, lying flat on the ocean floor bottom. The shallowest portion of the wreck is roughly 15 meters deep. Its stern, with lines connecting to the surface, is the simplest and safest and method form of entry.

Once you’re in, the vehicle deck can be seen from there. Soft corals cover most of the wreck and attract a diverse range of marine life such as tunas, barracudas, and trevallies. Lionfish, nudibranchs, and moray eels contribute to the wreck’s biodiversity. Larger fish like leopard or bamboo sharks, whale sharks, and even turtles are occasionally seen swimming in the vicinity.

The King Cruiser wreck is a dive site easily accessed, with depths ranging from 12 to 32 meters. However, when the disaster pieces started falling, entry to the debris became slightly perilous.

This famous wreck has attracted an impressive variety of marine species over the years, including schools of jackfish, scorpionfish, and lionfish. Many divers choose to take three (3) dives on this trip because only two (2) to three (3) minutes from the wreck are two (2) more fantastic dive sites: Anemone reef, where this boat struck, and Hin Usang, also known as Shark Point. Both of these dive sites provide diverse and spectacular marine life.

Takeaways

If you’re looking for tours around Koh Phi Phi Island’s shipwrecks, we hope this article helps you get covered! With shipwrecks waiting patiently beneath the clear waters of the Phi Phi Islands, it calls to you to start your next Phi Phi vacation with shipwrecked boat trips that would surely provide you with a fantastic experience and something worthwhile to remember always.